Collections, broadcast

From the explorations of Chris Boette

The Shadow Hero: giving an origin story to comics’ first Asian-American superhero

mostlysignssomeportents:

image

Gene Luen Yang has made comics history with his graphic novels about race and identity, now, with Sonny Liew, he goes back in time to reinvent the first Asian superhero in the history of comics. Cory Doctorow reviews The Shadow Hero and presents an exclusive excerpt.

Read more…

(Please reblog this!)

image

Imagine Africa as a new colonial theatre, with Google’s Project Loon up against Facebook’s planned 11,000 drones providing internet access — access that will doubtless require a Facebook account. While Ray Kurzweil toils in Google skunkworks to engineer some form of AI, and Facebook data scientists shamble towards an empathy algo that would emulate an element of higher animal consciousness.

It’s all good fun, out here in nightmare internet.

—   Warren Ellis and his morning thoughts
GOOD NEWS: IT’S SUMMAH!

GOOD NEWS: IT’S SUMMAH!

Tis Good! Tis News! (Yea, Tis Tuesday!)

“As part of the military’s ‘happiness campaign,’ Thailand’s generals ordered TV regulators to ensure fans can watch the World Cup for free.”

—   

Between this and the military government forbidding the display of the hand sign from The Hunger Games, Thailand is blowing my mind a little.

via Foreign Policy’s Morning Brief

“Yes, that is fifteen ‘f’ ‘s. A whole lot of f-ing going on if you want to create a new administator. [sic]”

—   Bugzilla docs from way back
GOOD NEWS: It’s your birthday!
Good News: It’s Tuesday!
"(assume that mixture separation is expensive)"

Best explanation of a key exchange I’ve ever seen.

"(assume that mixture separation is expensive)"

Best explanation of a key exchange I’ve ever seen.

Re: Good News: It’s Tuesday! (NSFWish)
Good News: It’s Tuesday! (NSFWish)
belovedlights:

i’m taking character commissions! signal boost is appreciated as well. i joke about suffering an untreated shoe addiction but for real i’m saving up money to move probably over the summer and whatever extra i can stuff away helps bunches!
i’ll draw your oc, literally you, fanart, your sexy fursona, whatever, come at me

belovedlights:

i’m taking character commissions! signal boost is appreciated as well. i joke about suffering an untreated shoe addiction but for real i’m saving up money to move probably over the summer and whatever extra i can stuff away helps bunches!

i’ll draw your oc, literally you, fanart, your sexy fursona, whatever, come at me

(via royalboiler)

To Train a Writer, by Ambrose Bierce

THERE is a good deal of popular ignorance about writing; it is commonly thought that good writing comes of a natural gift and that without the gift the trick can not be turned. This is true of great writing, but not of good. Any one with good natural intelligence and a fair education can be taught to write well, as he can be taught to draw well, or play billiards well, or shoot a rifle well, and so forth ; but to do any of these things greatly is another matter. If one can not do great work it is worth while to do good work and think it great.

I have had some small experience in teaching English composition, and some of my pupils are good enough to permit me to be rather proud of them. Some I have been able only to encourage, and a few will recall my efforts to profit them by dissuasion. I should not now think it worth while to teach a pupil to write merely well, but given one capable of writing greatly, and five years in which to train him, I should not permit him to put pen to paper for at least two of them — except to make notes. Those two years should be given to broadening and strengthening his mind, teaching him how to think and giving him something to think about — to sharpening his faculties of observation, dispelling his illusions and destroying his ideals. That would hurt: he would sometimes rebel, doubtless, and have to be subdued by a diet of bread and water and a poem on the return of our heroes from Santiago.

If I caught him reading a newly published book, save by way of penance, it would go hard with him. Of our modern education he should have enough to read the ancients: Plato, Aristotle, Marcus Aurelius, Seneca and that lot — custodians of most of what is worth knowing. He might retain what he could of the higher mathematics if he had been so prodigal of his time as to acquire any, and might learn enough of science to make him prefer poetry; but to learn from Euclid that the three angles of a triangle are equal to two right angles, yet not to learn from Epictetus how to be a worthy guest at the table of the gods, would be accounted a breach of contract.

But chiefly this fortunate youth with the brilliant future should learn to take comprehensive views, hold large convictions and make wide generalizations. He should, for example, forget that he is an American and remember that he is a Man. He should be neither Christian, nor Jew, nor Buddhist, nor Mahometan, nor Snake Worshiper. To local standards of right and wrong he should be civilly indifferent. In the virtues, so-called, he should discern only the rough notes of a general expediency; in fixed moral principles only time-saving predecisions of cases not yet before the court of conscience. Happiness should disclose itself to his enlarging intelligence as the end and purpose of life; art and love as the only means to happiness. He should free himself of all doctrines, theories, etiquettes, politics, simplifying his life and mind, attaining clarity with breadth and unity with height. To him a continent should not seem wide, nor a century long. And it would be needful that he know and have an ever present consciousness that this is a world of fools and rogues, blind with superstition, tormented with envy, consumed with vanity, selfish, false, cruel, cursed with illusions — frothing mad!

We learn in suffering what we teach in song — and prose. I should pray that my young pupil would occasionally go wrong, experiencing the educational advantages of remorse; that he would dally with some of the more biting vices. I should be greatly obliged if Fortune would lay upon him, now and then, a heavy affliction. A bereavement or two, for example, would be welcome, although I should not care to have a hand in it. He must have joy, too — O, a measureless exuberance of joy; and hate, and fear, hope, despair and love — love inexhaustible, a permanent provision. He must be a sinner and in turn a saint, a hero, a wretch. Experiences and emotions — these are necessaries of the literary life. To the great writer they are as indispensable as sun and air to the rose, or good, fat, edible vapors to toads. When my pupil should have had two years of this he would be permitted to try his ‘prentice hand at a pig story in words of one syllable. And I should think it very kind and friendly if Mr. George Sylvester Vierick would consent to be the pig.

1899.

Re: Gooooood News: It’s Tuesday!

Re: Gooooood News: It’s Tuesday!

Gooooood News: It’s Tuesday!

Gooooood News: It’s Tuesday!